Guest blog: Pad Krapao Nua

Singlemade: Pad krapao nua

Luc Dingemans is Singlemade’s first guest! He surprises us with a Thai recipe, which he describes to be super easy, authentic and a real crowd pleaser! Well, he’s got our attention! 🙂

Okay, Dingemans doesn’t really sound Thai, but this Antwerp resident discovered oriental cooking by following love! His first love led him to the Philippines, his second love was Thai.

Although they’re both oriental, there are remarkable differences between the Philippine and Thai cuisines. 300 years of Spanish rule has strongly influenced the Philippine cuisine, and the country’s poverty is reflected in its food: a lot of grease, a lot of fish (because it’s easy to get) and a lot of vinegar. The Thai cuisine is much leaner and relies heavily on sauces (oyster, fish, soy,…). And they do like it spicy! Although they make plenty of non-spicy dishes as well, a Thai will stir in some dried chili anyway!

Luc’s cooking can be described as a mix of Philippine and Thai. And he’s a fervent cook as well! In fact, he’s opening his own place: Turo Turo! It’s a Philippine expression that means ‘just point’ and that’s what Luc’s going for: just look at the dishes in the counter and point at what you want, then pay by the pound!

Luc’s looking at locations to open up shop, so Antwerp, hold on to your chopsticks! If you can’t wait, you can already order his creations through Flavr every wednesday. Make sure to try out his famous spring rolls! Click here for more info!

Logo Turo Turo

Luc’s revealed one of his Thai recipes for Singlemade. It’s made with different kinds of flesh, usually Nua (beef) or Kai (chicken). And the Thai like to mix it up and add minced meat to this dish! You can also just stick to minced meat, but it’ll change the taste and feel of the recipe.

You can’t avoid buying some sauces though. You can easily find them in any supermarket’s exotic department and it’s a small price to pay for an authentic Thai experience! 🙂

Ps: This recipe is spicy and has a lot of garlic in it, so watch out if you have an important meeting coming up ;-).

Pps: In the ingredient list you can find the Asian ingredients. Some western alternatives are listed in the Recipe notes.

Print Recipe
Guest blog: Pad Krapao Nua
Guest blog: Pad Krapao Nua
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Oriental
Prep Time 15 min
Cook Time 10 min
Servings
Ingredients
To garnish
Side dish
Course Main Dish
Cuisine Oriental
Prep Time 15 min
Cook Time 10 min
Servings
Ingredients
To garnish
Side dish
Guest blog: Pad Krapao Nua
Instructions
  1. Once you start with the wok, things get going fast, so make sure everything’s ready to go:
Mise-en-place
  1. Cook the rice according to the instructions.
  2. Rinse the beans and shake off the excess water. Cut off the tips and then cut into thumb long pieces. If you’re using regular green beans, just cut them in halves. If you like your beans soft, then you can cook them in the microwave oven for about 3 min under cover or cook them in boiling, salted water until al dente.
  3. Cut the beef into thin strips.
  4. Cut the big Spanish pepper into thin rings, until you get to the seeds. Scrape them out of the pepper before continuing to cut into rings.
  5. Peel the cloves of garlic, cut them in halves, remove the green germ (it’s usually bitter) and chop finely.
  6. Pinch off the 2 chili’s stems and cut them lengthwise. Turn over your knife and use the blunt side to grate the seeds out. Cut the chilis up and add them to the mortar. Smash them into a paste. Then add the garlic and keep mashing until you get an even, red paste. ****
Wok
  1. Put a wok over high heat and add a good dash of oil (about 2 tablespoons). When the oil’s hot, add the chili-garlic paste. Stir fry for about 30 seconds.
  2. Add the flesh (beef ànd minced meat) to the wok and fry until the flesh has coloured.
  3. Add the beans to the flesh with 1 tablespoon of oyster sauce, 1 tablespoon of soy sauce, 1 tablespoon of fish sauce and a pinch of sugar.
  4. Mix well and let simmer over high heat for 3 to 4 minutes. Stir regularly.
  5. Take the wok off the heat and mix in the basil leaves. Garnish with the red pepper rings. Done!
Recipe Notes

* Long beans are long oriental beans, to be found in the Chinese supermarket. You can replace them with regular green beans. Make sure they’re fresh.

** Thai basil is stronger than western basil. You can find it in oriental shops. If you can’t find it, stick to regular basil.

*** Pandan rice contributes to the ultimate Thai experience, but Pad Krapao Nua is just as good with any other long grain rice, like Basmati.

**** Don’t have a mortar? Take a large knife and chop up the chilis with the garlic. Then squash the bits together with the flat of your blade. If you don’t have a large chef’s knife, you can use a spoon.

Tip: if you don’t like it too spicy, use large Spanish peppers to make the chili-garlic paste. It’ll still pack a punch, without burning your mouth :-).


Input Singlemade test panel

Carine isn’t a big fan of oriental cooking. She likes the southern European cuisine, with plenty of sauces. But nevertheless, she loves this dish!
Carine’s tip: like veggies as much as she does? Just add some extra beans!

Valerie and Michael  just adore it! Valerie had all the sauces and even had some proper Thai beers to serve alongside! The mix of different meats really hit home with her! Michael describes this recipe as a simple and delicious dish for meatlovers.
Tip: Valerie does warn that it’s pretty spicy. Next time she makes it, she’ll use just one half chili pepper. Carine also cut down on the spiciness.


#Singlemade_it

Follow our Singlemade heroes into the fray and try this recipe! Share your Singlemade creations through #singlemade_it@singlemade of minne@singlemade.be!

Have fun cooking and… bon appétit! 🙂

Feel free to comment! ;-)